Text Messages as Party Admissions to Prove a Prima Facie Case

The Plaintiff in a sexual harassment case was able to demonstrate a prima facie case to overturn a summary judgment on the narrow issue whether she was retaliated against for filing her lawsuit.  Magiera v. City of Dallas, 2010 U.S. App. LEXIS 16802 (5th Cir. Tex. Aug. 11, 2010).

The key evidence? A text message.

One of the challenges to the summary judgment was whether there was sufficient evidence for a jury to find that the Plaintiff was removed from her field training officer (FTO) duties because of her sexual harassment complaint.  Magiera, at *9-10.

The Plaintiff’s removal from FTO duties meant she received less compensation.    Id.

The Defendant conceded in oral argument that the Plaintiff being removed from her FTO duties was a material adverse action. Id.  

Here is how the Plaintiff was able to show a prima facie case:  A sergeant testified that her supervising lieutenant stated that the Plaintiff was not on FTO because another lieutenant was “angry” the Plaintiff had filed her lawsuit.  Magiera, at *10.

The same sergeant sent the Plaintiff the following text message:    

“I was told by [W]oodbury that [B]arnard said you had a law suit against the city and you shouldnt [sic] train because of the suit.”

Magiera, at *10.

The Plaintiff argued that the statements in text message evidenced the retaliation for her lawsuit.  Magiera, at *10.

The Defendant challenged the text message as not competent summary judgment evidence, because it was hearsay.  Magiera, at *10-11. 

The Plaintiff argued that the statement was admissible as a party admission, under Federal Rule of Evidence Rule 801(d)(2)(D).

The Party Admission Rule states that an admission by a party-opponent is not hearsay, if “[t]he statement is offered against a party and is . . . a statement by the party’s agent or servant concerning a matter within the scope of the agency or employment, made during the existence of the relationship.”  Magiera, at *11, citing Federal Rule of Evidence Rule 801(d)(2)(D).

The Court agreed.  The Lieutenant who made the statement (if it was true) was speaking in the course of his employment, which would make the statement admissible as a party admission.  Magiera, at *11.

The Court held that the Plaintiff made a prima facie case on the retaliation claim and reversed and remanded on those specific grounds.  Magiera, at *15-16. 

Bow Tie Thoughts

Text messages are quick and easy to send.  Attorneys should not overlook requesting text messages in discovery, there could be a smoking gun to make your case…or at least survive a motion for summary judgment.

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